THE EPISTLE PROJECT

With COVID’s end nowhere in sight, we all know what toll guaranteeing has done on people’s mental health, physical well-being and general livelihood.

STORY

The word ‘epistle’ comes from the Greek word epistole, meaning letter or message. Epistles were primarily written communications during the time of the New Testament. For example, Paul, Peter, and John wrote epistles or letters to churches or individuals (Timothy, Titus, Philemon).

Jesus has given His people His love letter, which is His revealed Word. The apostles sent letters to churches to instruct the people there.

With the premise of loving the Lord and loving handwritten letters, the idea of The Epistle Project came about.

For those of who know me, I LOVE receiving mail from family or friends that’s something other than bills. Letters are a great way to allow the elderly to feel included and loved on during this pandemic.

COVID-19 UPDATE

COVID-19 UPDATE (accurate to-date): I am still accepting letters amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Now is a better time than ever, I feel like, to support those are often times forgotten.

The CDC, World Health Organization, and Surgeon General have indicated that there is currently no evidence that COVID-19 is being spread through the mail. hehe

Thank you for supporting our elders during this critical effort to fight loneliness. Physical isolation is important for public health right now, but our elders deserve to feel supported, too.

I’d love it if you’d write a handwritten letter today to support what I am hoping to do – bring joy who need it the most.

HOW IT WORKS:

LETTERS THEY LOVE:

In anticipation of Letter to An Elder Day on February 26th, I are collecting cards and mailing these to elders in a local Asheville senior community.

Take a few minutes, sit down and write a letter to an elder (a stranger). Tell them about yourself, tell a joke or a riddle and include a picture if that’s something you feel comfortable with. The biggest thing is to let them know how loved they are.

If might feel difficult at first to be writing to someone you don’t know. My advice: pretend like it’s a normal conversation. What kinds of things would you want to talk about with a stranger?

GUIDELINES:

  • Letters must be legible (large print) and handwritten. Don’t fret if you are not artistic – make your card as what you’d like to receive.
  • Exclude the date (date/month/year).
  • Embrace creativity! Recipients love it when the letters are personal. We encourage you make your letters colorful an fun – photos, crosswords and drawings are great!
  • Be kind and thoughtful. This is a one-way letter exchange, so you will not receive a letter back. Receiving nothing in return is part of the beauty of your act of kindness, and recipients aren’t burdened by feeling obligated or unable to respond.
  • Envelope your letters if you can! It’s so much nicer to receive an enveloped card. If you’re sending more than one letter, leave your enveloping letters unsealed and unstamped to send them in a larger envelope or box.
  • Share your act of kindness! Tag us @theepistleproject, #theepistleproject and #lettertoanelderday.
  • Send as may cards as you’d like! We accept letters year-round, so there’s no deadline for when you must send them by. If you’re cards are holiday-themed or seasonal, send them a month before that holiday or the end of that season. (If your letters are late, we’ll definitely say them for next year)
  • Ready to mail? Yay! Send to:

    The Epistle Project

    8 Timber Court
    Apt. D

    Asheville, NC 28803

If you have any questions at all, PLEASE feel free to message me. I would love nothing more to include your cards with mine and to enandate them with hundreds of letters to read. Help me to jumpstart this “idea” of mine and join me in this journey to see where it goes and how it grows.

SHARE:

If you aren’t ready to write a card just yet, help me in getting the word out. Share this blog or the Epistle Project’s Instagram below.